Lost Library Books

Ben Malo and Edited by Valerie Alcala

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If one were to ask any librarian in the world what the biggest problem is with the library system, I guarantee you they would say that it is lost books. Most people that I know only spend the amount of time required in class in the library, but honestly it’s an interesting place. It’s something much more impressive as soon as you look at it from another point of view. It’s a place not only where kids rush to print out there homework right before it’s due, but where they socialize. Unfortunately though, libraries all around the world are struggling because of lost books.

It’s tough to collect funds in a library at a public school because books are lost, stolen or forgotten over time. A due date is assigned to every book once you check it out, and I’m not going to sit here and pretend like I haven’t forgotten a homework assignment or a due date for a project, but usually I’ll turn it in late for half credit. So, the problem isn’t late books, it’s books that never get returned.

I spoke to Canyon High Schools librarian, Ms. Fischer, about this topic and she definitely enlightened me. Books that are MIA are a problem!!  Our library loses money throughout the school year;  she told me specific numbers that were pretty insane. At the beginning of the year, the library has already lost 7,350 library books and 10,417 textbooks. The total lost books amounts to $2,580,217.79, for THIS YEAR. The worst part about this is that the school LOSES  hundreds of dollars every time a student loses a book. If an AP Euro book is $280, they can only charge half, resulting in huge sums of lost money. YIKES!! Comanches, I beg you, turn in your textbooks. Trust me when I tell you that this is a bigger problem than you know.

1 Comment

One Response to “Lost Library Books”

  1. Michael Ambrose on October 5th, 2018 8:47 am

    This is a generally well-written article, but the lack of direct quotes limits its ability to fully express the idea at hand. Direct quotes, particularly from an authority of the matter such as Mrs. Fischer on the subject of library challenges, provides a more compelling argument and follows a more journalistic style.
    Additionally, the use of the first person, while not necessarily wrong, weakens an article that could just as easily be stated from a more objective, impersonal 3rd person point of view.

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Lost Library Books